See How One Family in Ecuador is Recovering From COVID-19 - CARE
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See How One Family in Ecuador is Recovering From COVID-19

A woman in a hat and face mask stands in a city street in front of her apartment

All photos: Vicente Gaibor and Santiago Arcos/CARE

All photos: Vicente Gaibor and Santiago Arcos/CARE

Angélica Romero was infected last spring, had to stop work, and is still trying to recover. Here’s a glimpse at how she and her family spend their days at home.

Angélica Romero lives in Guayaquil, Ecuador, with her husband Maximiliano Ayoví and their three children. Angélica, who makes a living as a domestic worker, contracted COVID-19 in the spring and became so ill she nearly died. Her husband was also infected around the same time. Last spring, Guayaquil was among the cities in Latin America worst hit by COVID-19, with The New York Times and others reporting that the city’s total coronavirus deaths could be up to 15 times higher than official counts as many people were dying at home and bodies were being left in the streets.

25

DAYS

Angélica was very sick with COVID-19 for 25 days

Angélica and her husband both survived COVID-19, but Angélica’s recovery continues at home with regular diclofenac injections administered by her son. Maximiliano lost his job at a shrimp farm and Angélica has not worked since the onset of the pandemic in March. The couple is struggling to feed their family due to the lack of income. The family spends its days together at home, passing the time playing cards, while Angélica works to regain her health.

“COVID has left me a little off. I was a happy, smiling woman and I would like to be the same person I was before.”

CARE has been responding to COVID-19 in Ecuador since the onset of the pandemic, providing those in need with cash transfers, food and hygiene supplies, emergency shelter and delivery of medical supplies, medicines and medical exams. CARE is also advocating for the needs of domestic workers like Angélica, as well as migrant, refugees, day laborers, street vendors, sexual workers and other vulnerable populations.

“COVID has left me a little off. I was a happy, smiling woman and I would like to be the same person I was before,” Angélica says.
Maximiliano, who’s also recovered from COVID-19, lost his job at a shrimp farm.
Maximiliano now drives a tricimoto on Trinitaria Island, Guayaquil.
A man in a face mask looks at a syringe
Angélica’s son prepares her diclofenac injection, part of her post-COVID-19 care.
A man and a woman sit in doorway with the door open.
Angélica’s older son and 17-year-old daughter Nayeli spend time together at home on Isla Trinitaria, Guayaquil.
A boy sits at a table looking at a mobile phone.
Elquin, 11, Angélica and Maximiliano’s youngest, plays on a cell phone.
Five adults sit and stand in a kitchen.
On weekends, Angélica’s younger sister and nephews visit to cook, eat and play cards.

"If I see a friend arriving, I tell them, “Stay there, I'm going to spray alcohol on you,” Angélica says.

A woman in a face mask peels a potato in a kitchen.

Angélica prepares a meal during a visit from her extended family.

The family passes the time playing cards together.

A woman in a hat and face mask stands in a city street in front of her apartment
"I was very bad for 25 days with COVID,” Angélica says, “I know that in the name of the Lord [I’ll get better] little by little. I have been nervous and scared I don’t know for how long.”