Women's Empowerment

Michael Alandu is the governance advisor for CARE International in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He wrote this open letter to his three-year-old son, John Paul, explaining why he won't be at their home in the Atlanta suburbs for Father's Day. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

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Girls in the devastated city of Goma, “the rape capital of the world,” are breaking stereotypes to find work—and independence—as car mechanics and carpenters.

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When Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines in November 2013 CARE was on the ground within days providing food, shelter and supplies. Within three months the anti-poverty organization had raised $20 million toward assisting the storm ravaged nation and within six months had helped 300,000 people.

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Patoma Arama is 48 years old and a polygamist from the village of Ama, located 4 kilometers from Ouo, in the region of Mopti. In 2009, Patoma was identified by CARE Mali as a Community Relay for the promotion of maternal and child health. Later, he was identified as a Change Agent for CARE Mali’s Men Engage initiative. Patoma is from a community in which men are resistant to supporting women in their development activities. In spite of this resistance, he quickly understood that women are at the center of sustainable development.

ATLANTA  — The global poverty fighting group CARE hailed the bipartisan Senate introduction of the International Violence Against Women Act, which makes ending violence against women and girls a top U.S. diplomatic priority.

The bill number S. 2307 was introduced by Senators Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., Susan Collins, R-Maine, Robert Menendez, D-NJ, Mark Kirk, R-Ill., and Jeanne Shaheen, D-NH. 

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In the Koh Kong province of Cambodia, CARE is tackling poverty by teaching women to become innovators. The Young Women in Business project helps women access employment and income opportunities in this area of Southwestern Cambodia where gender inequality is high and job opportunities are scarce.

Chim Srey Thorn, age 27, is one of these women who now runs her own business thanks to the training she got from CARE. Through the Young Women in Business project she learned how to raise livestock, manage a small business and handle finances. She also learned basic veterinary skills. 

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