Women & Girls

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In the Koh Kong province of Cambodia, CARE is tackling poverty by teaching women to become innovators. The Young Women in Business project helps women access employment and income opportunities in this area of Southwestern Cambodia where gender inequality is high and job opportunities are scarce.

Chim Srey Thorn, age 27, is one of these women who now runs her own business thanks to the training she got from CARE. Through the Young Women in Business project she learned how to raise livestock, manage a small business and handle finances. She also learned basic veterinary skills. 

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The “bead game” was designed to address some of the pressure women in certain cultures feel to give birth to boy children, and reduce the stigma placed upon women who give birth to girls.

With the help of two colored beads representing the X and Y chromosomes, the game demonstrated how the sex of a child is determined.

The key point, that it is a chromosome from the man that determines the sex of the child, was overwhelmingly popular with the women, who said they were often blamed by their husbands or families if they did not produce a baby boy.

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She was a top student. Now, violence and bullying keep her from school.

 

Raghad, age 11, should be in 5th grade, but hasn’t been to school in two-and-a-half years because she and her family have had to move so many times during the Syrian conflict.

A refugee in Jordan now, Raghad’s face lights up and her words come quick when she talks about her old life in Syria. What it was like to walk home from school with friends and gossip about their teachers, do homework and chores after school, and then play with her cousins, who lived nearby.

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This ‘Disposable’ Girl Became The Most Educated Person in Her Village.

 

Seen as disposable in their own homes, the destiny of girls in poor rural villages like Schti in northern India is to marry early and move out to live with another family, continuing the cycle of girls’ illiteracy — and poverty — for the next generation.

“My brothers had gone to school, but I thought I’d never experience it,” Pinki recalls. “It was out of the question.”

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