Women & Children in Emergencies

Women and Girls at Risk as South Sudan Violence Continues, Warns CARE

Image (media): 

CARE calls for humanitarian access so that displaced people have food, water, shelter and health care

JUBA (Jan. 16, 2014)—As the armed conflict in South Sudan enters its second month, CARE calls for an end to the violence and continues to support lifesaving work in dozens of the country’s clinics. CARE is especially concerned about the effect of the violence on women and girls.

Earthquake in Haiti: CARE Banks on Women in Recovery

Image (media): 

Four years after a deadly earthquake devastated Haiti, a web of political gridlock, donor fatigue and chaotic property laws continues to stall rebuilding in one of the world's poorest countries. But the humanitarian organization CARE is working to remove another, oft-overlooked barrier — lack of participation by women — as a way to strengthen recovery efforts and build a better foundation for the future. 

CARE on International Children's Day: Child Labor on Rise Among Syrian Refugees

Image (media): 

AMMAN (Nov. 15, 2013) Ahead of International Children's Day on November 20, CARE voices our concern about Syrian refugee families becoming increasingly reliant on child labor to meet basic survival needs such as food and rent. According to the latest Jordanian government estimates around 30,000 Syrian children are currently working in Jordan. The International Labor Organization warns that the number of child laborers in Jordan may be even higher. In Lebanon, at least 50,000 Syrian refugee children need to work to support their families.

One Tent Among Many

Image (media): 

Ali lies on the ground on a brown pillow with floral print. His eyes are open, but motionless. His skinny arms and legs feebly lie beside him, as if they were not part of his body. His mother Fawsa sits next to him, softly massaging his lower legs and caressing his head. Ali does not move. He does not blink, even though flies are making themselves comfortable on his eyelids. Fawsa’s gaze wanders through the small tent, which became their home a couple of days ago. Apart from a few mattresses and pillows, the room is empty. Fawsa’s other two sons are sitting in another corner of the room.

Pages