Women & Children in Emergencies

Juliet Inisa is a single mother of three children ages 13, five and two. She had to work hard on her own to provide for her kids.

JUBA (Feb. 17, 2014) – The South Sudan crisis will worsen unless relief organizations are able to deliver supplies before being cut off by the approaching rainy season, the humanitarian group CARE warned this week.

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Wilma remains faithful that her new baby will be a bearer of good fortune for their family.

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Lyza's decisiveness and courage saved four lives, including that of her unborn baby.

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Chronic crisis?

"The world needs to accept that many parts of Niger and the Sahel are now in a state of chronic crisis," explained Barbara Jackson, Humanitarian Director, CARE International, in 2012.

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CARE calls for humanitarian access so that displaced people have food, water, shelter and health care

JUBA (Jan. 16, 2014)—As the armed conflict in South Sudan enters its second month, CARE calls for an end to the violence and continues to support lifesaving work in dozens of the country’s clinics. CARE is especially concerned about the effect of the violence on women and girls.

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Four years after a deadly earthquake devastated Haiti, a web of political gridlock, donor fatigue and chaotic property laws continues to stall rebuilding in one of the world's poorest countries. But the humanitarian organization CARE is working to remove another, oft-overlooked barrier — lack of participation by women — as a way to strengthen recovery efforts and build a better foundation for the future. 

Nahla Abdul-Raheem fled her own comfortable two-story home in Dara'a, Syria, with her husband and five children, the youngest daughter just 4 years old.

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