Women & Children in Emergencies


Refugee Crisis: Two Women, a Shared Fate

Gambo and Hadja both fled Northern Nigeria with their children to seek shelter and peace in Niger. Their lives are put on hold.


Refugee Crisis: 40 More Mouths to Feed

More than 80 percent of refugees from Nigeria have found shelter in host families in Niger, most of them poor and chronically hungry themselves. This is an account of humbling hospitality and one woman’s strength.


Refugee Crisis: “Alive is better than anything else”

Fana is 17 years old. But the horrors she has lived through in Nigeria are enough for a lifetime.


Ebola Outbreak: Spreading Economic Opportunities Amidst Crisis

The outbreak of the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone and Liberia did not just infect and kill thousands of people. It brought these West Africa countries to a standstill. Entire communities were quarantined. Borders were sealed off. Markets closed. People were confined to their homes.


In Syria and Neighboring Countries “winter puts Syrian families at risk of disease and death”

AMMAN - As another harsh winter season approaches in the Middle East, CARE International calls for the immediate release of further funding to support millions of people caught up in the conflict in Syria and in neighbouring countries.


Lack of women’s participation an obstacle to recovery and peace in Gaza, says CARE

JERUSALEM—(October 9, 2014)-- Increased participation by Palestinian women is crucial to creating a process towards peacefully resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and bringing sustainable development to the West Bank and Gaza, according to international humanitarian organi


South Sudan: Surviving on Hopes for Peace

“When will the world help us live in peace again?” That’s the burning question that Nyagadh has as she tries to resume some kind of life in an internally displaced persons (IDP) camp, but living in fear of fighting and wondering how she will feed her family is not the life she thought she would h


South Sudan: Fear after Sunset

“We stay in our tent every night because bad things happen at night here. It’s not safe,” says Josephine, who sits with her four children in a tent the size of a small closet.