Refugees

More than 2 million Syrians have fled their country, according to the United Nations refugee agency. With nowhere to go and often with just the clothes on their backs, many end up in refugee camps that are both overcrowded and overwhelmed. Many organizations are offering supplies, shelter and medical care for the people displaced by the crisis and you can help.

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"I didn't understand how to save. I'd spend small amounts on nothing," says Mysoon Al Harthy, a 45-year-old Iraqi refugee woman living in Jordan. "Now I have a lot of savings."

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A dozen Syrian girls, ages 12 to 16, mainly refugees from the flattened city of Homs, sit in a semicircle. Their heads are covered. They are naturally reticent in dealing with a male foreigner. But they eventually warm up, talking about their escapes, their plans for school and Syrian pop stars.

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The UN says more than 2 million refugees have left Syria. But while up to 70,000 refugees fled to Jordan in early 2013, the stream has dwindled to a trickle. Aid workers believe the Jordanian government has closed the border, but Jordan says it's due to Syrian fighting. 

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The United Nations announced last week that the  number of Syrian refugees has surpassed the 2 million mark. This hour, Kathleen Dun and her guests talk about the humanitarian crisis in the region. 

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The political and diplomatic crisis in Syria have caught the world's attention.  But the continuing conflict is also producing a humanitarian crisis:  millions of refugees.  And the world is only now becoming aware of the scale of the problem.  

The Atlanta-based relief organization CARE is again trying to help.  WABE's Denis O'Hayer spoke with CARE's president and CEO, Dr. Helene Gayle.

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Leader of global humanitarian organization visits CARE's work, meets Jordan's Queen Rania and Prime Minister 

AMMAN (Oct. 2, 2013) - CARE President and CEO Helene D. Gayle visited Jordan this week to see firsthand the poverty-fighting organization's work with Syrian refugees and meet senior national leaders and officials.

On December 15, a CARE team returned from an evaluation mission to South Masisi territory in the North Kivu Province of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) ’” the first one to take place in the region by any humanitarian organization.

Starting in mid-November, the rural areas surrounding Goma, the provincial capital of North Kivu, had been inaccessible due to increased fighting. A CARE team of three visited several villages in south Masisi in a convoy organized by the World Food Programme as soon as the security situation allowed.

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About a year ago, the world started to watch with alarm the growing number of people suffering from a severe food crisis engulfing the Sahel region, which, at its peak, affected more than 18 million people.

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