Refugees

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Ali lies on the ground on a brown pillow with floral print. His eyes are open, but motionless. His skinny arms and legs feebly lie beside him, as if they were not part of his body. His mother Fawsa sits next to him, softly massaging his lower legs and caressing his head. Ali does not move. He does not blink, even though flies are making themselves comfortable on his eyelids. Fawsa’s gaze wanders through the small tent, which became their home a couple of days ago. Apart from a few mattresses and pillows, the room is empty. Fawsa’s other two sons are sitting in another corner of the room.

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When I met Zyad for the first time, he was registering himself in CARE’s refugee centre in Amman. He asked me whether he could tell me his story. He said he wanted the world to hear it.

To give Syrian refugees a louder voice amid a conflict whose political dimensions draw most of the world’s attention, American photographers Robert Fogarty and Ben Reece first gave them felt-tip markers. The refugees eagerly wrote messages to world leaders on their arms and hands. Then Reece and Fogarty, who travelled with CARE to Jordan in September 2013, photographed them.

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CARE calls for the immediate support of millions of Syrian refugees so they can protect themselves from the cold weather in the coming months.

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CARE is working to help Syrians meet their most urgent needs and protect their dignity. We are on the ground in Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Yemen and Syria, collaborating with partners and helping people displaced by the conflict and the communities hosting them. Here's an overview of the assistance we've been able to provide to date:

JORDAN

American photographers Robert Fogarty and Benjamin Reece traveled to Jordan in September with CARE. For years, Fogerty has been working on “Dear World,” a project in which he photographs people with messages written on their arms.

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For all the global attention on Syria, all the newspaper headlines, leaders’ speeches and millions of YouTube views, the voices of those bearing the heaviest cost of the conflict are absent from discussions of what to do.

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