Men & Boys

Hands clap and fingers snap as a group of women and men watch CARE staff Rose Vive Lobo’s lips and respond to her questions.

"What does sexual violence mean? Do you know different forms of such violence? What are women’s and men’s rights and obligations?"

Twenty women and men have been selected to participate. They’re representatives from each of three displacement camps in Goma, the provincial capital of North Kivu in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

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One of hunger’s cruelest tricks is that it reinforces and replicates itself. Yanka says that when forced to choose between school for her children and food, she chose food. In that circumstance there is no good choice.

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Marie-Goreth, 18, has never been to school. She cannot read or write. She wakes in the morning to walk almost one hour to a field where her family grows rice and sweet potatoes. After returning home from laboring in the fields all day, Marie-Goreth, who has nine brothers, prepares the family's meals lunch and dinner, fetches water, gathers firewood and helps her mother tend to her younger siblings. But none of that slows Marie-Goreth's ambition to improve her life and the lives of those around her.

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The Yugoslavian Wars of 1991-2001 were based on national and ethnic tensions that resulted in numerous cases of gender-based violence, including mass rapes of women and sexual abuse against men and boys in prison camps. Currently, an emerging culture of violence is visible in the Western Balkans and the consequences of violence within the family and the community severely affects the development and health of young men and young women.

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The Yugoslavian Wars of 1991-2001 were based on national and ethnic tensions that resulted in numerous cases of gender-based violence , including mass rapes of women and sexual abuse against men and boys in prison camps. Currently, an emerging culture of violence is visible in the Western Balkans and the consequences of violence within the family and the community severely affects the development and health of young men and young women.

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My name is Dhan Bahadur Pariyar. I was born 35 years ago into an untouchable-caste family. I live with my 65-year-old father Mate, my 70-year-old mother Mangali, wife Suk Maya and Subash, who is 7.

When I was young, my family grew crops on our land, which was less than half an acre and could only meet our food needs for three months of the year. I left school in the fifth grade to earn money so that we could eat for the other nine months.

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