Market Access

Image (media): 

Tennis star launches a campaign with Join My Village to provide expanded education opportunities for young women in Africa; challenges her fans around the world to help 

ATLANTA – Tennis champion Venus Williams is partnering with CARE, one of the world’s largest humanitarian organizations, to raise awareness of and encourage support for girls’ education in the developing world by supporting programs in Kenya and Malawi. 

“If you have the right aspiration and devotion towards what you want to achieve in life, I guarantee that you will reach it at some point in time!”  

These are the words that Selina Akhter, a 20 year old girl was saying to other village girls her age.  In just six months, she was able to change her life like no one else in her village.  She is an example of how one’s own dedication and sincerity can fulfill goals in life, despite many obstacles.

Girls in the devastated city of Goma, “the rape capital of the world,” are breaking stereotypes to find work—and independence—as car mechanics and carpenters.

Read the Article

 

 

Image (media): 

In the Koh Kong province of Cambodia, CARE is tackling poverty by teaching women to become innovators. The Young Women in Business project helps women access employment and income opportunities in this area of Southwestern Cambodia where gender inequality is high and job opportunities are scarce.

Chim Srey Thorn, age 27, is one of these women who now runs her own business thanks to the training she got from CARE. Through the Young Women in Business project she learned how to raise livestock, manage a small business and handle finances. She also learned basic veterinary skills. 

Image (media): 

CARE is working to create lasting market-based solutions to poverty.

By focusing on self-sustaining business models with high social and economic impact, our social enterprise ventures can become important agents of change in communities with underdeveloped markets.

Image (media): 

Undeveloped transportation infrastructure in Zambia is a major constraint to improved productivity for the estimated 800,000 smallholder farmers living in remote, rural areas of the country.

Without transportation, these farmers either have to pay inflated prices for local goods, or travel up to 120km to access affordable seeds, fertilizers, herbicides, pesticides and other farming essentials.

Image (media): 

One of hunger’s cruelest tricks is that it reinforces and replicates itself. Yanka says that when forced to choose between school for her children and food, she chose food. In that circumstance there is no good choice.

Image (media): 

Work is hard to find in Koibortopara, the remote village in northern Bangladesh where Kallani and her family struggled for years to survive.

“We had no way out,” she says. “No food, no clothing, as we had no consistent income.”

Frustrated at being unable to provide for his family, Kallani’s husband was angry and sometimes violent. Though she was weary, Kallani kept looking for a path out of her family’s misery.

Pages