Hunger

How American food aid can hurt local farmers

An Atlanta chef hopes to help transform lives and raise awareness of communities struggling around the world through CARE.

WASHINGTON (Feb. 4, 2014) - CARE applauds the Senate approval of reforms to the U.S. international food assistance program contained in the 2014 Farm Bill under the leadership of Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI), working with Sen. Thad Cochran (R-MS), and House colleagues, Rep. Frank Lucas (R-OK) and Rep. Collin Peterson (D-MN).  

Bamako, Mali - Ahead of the Sahel Appeal to be launched by the United Nations on the February 3, 2014 in Rome, 11 humanitarian agencies warn that northern Mali is set to face another serious food crisis unless funds are rapidly mobilized.

More than 800,000 people need immediate food assistance, and across the country, 3 million people are at risk of not finding enough to eat. More than half of these people are living in northern Mali.

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WASHINGTON (Jan. 23, 2014) — Congressional chiefs of staff from seven states and a group of journalists traveled to Ethiopia with the global poverty-fighting organization CARE to see how U.S. investments in food and nutrition security are enhancing the resilience and self-sufficiency of smallholder farmers.

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Undeveloped transportation infrastructure in Zambia is a major constraint to improved productivity for the estimated 800,000 smallholder farmers living in remote, rural areas of the country.

Without transportation, these farmers either have to pay inflated prices for local goods, or travel up to 120km to access affordable seeds, fertilizers, herbicides, pesticides and other farming essentials.

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Currently, some 2 billion people worldwide do not have access to clean, safe cooking fuels.

This contributes to economic, health and environmental problems, including deforestation, and places an enormous burden on poor families.

CARE has significant experience introducing clean energy products in vulnerable communities.  

In Darfur, Sudan, for example, CARE introduced fuel-efficient stoves to reduce demand on the region’s scant supply of firewood – a source of communal tension and violence. 

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In Bangladesh, one of the biggest problems people face is increasingly frequent and severe flooding. This affects access to food and clean water, as well as people’s ability to earn a living.

CARE worked with community leaders to create innovative counter-measures. Many of their ideas were as simple as they are effective. For example, raising poultry is a common livelihood strategy – especially for women. Unfortunately, chickens often drown during protracted floods; this can be a major blow to household economies.

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