Family Planning

We explore where food aid fits into U.S. diplomatic strategy, and how this new legislation affects, and doesn't affect, the status quo.

Image (media): 

In early 2010, with an infant in her arms, another on the way, and a heavy load of daily household chores, Meeta quickly grew weak and ill with exhaustion. But Ramkishore, her husband, did not help her with the chores.

Image (media): 

CARE’s Supporting Access to Family Planning and Post Abortion Care (SAFPAC) initiative, operating in Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo and Pakistan, integrates essential sexual and reproductive health services into new and ongoing humanitarian emergencies, emphasizing access to family planning and post-abortion care. SAFPAC’s experience has shown that a progressive policy environment contributes to expanding women’s access to reproductive health services.

Tékponon Jikuagou (TJ), which loosely translates to “using all means to reduce maternal mortality,” is an innovative project designed to address unmet need for family planning in Benin by intervening through women’s and men’s social networks.   

Funded by USAID-funded, TJ is implemented by a consortium led by Georgetown University’s Institute for Reproductive Health, in collaboration with CARE and Plan International.

The Family Planning Results Initiative was implemented in Rwanda, Kenya, and Ethiopia with the goal of increasing and sustaining the use of family planning.

In line with CARE’s commitment to the needs and rights of women and girls, SAFPAC integrates essential sexual and reproductive health services into new and ongoing humanitarian emergencies, emphasizing access to family planning and post-abortion care.

Image (media): 

Gender equality cannot be achieved if women cannot control if and when they have children. As world leaders convene on July 11, 2012, for the family planning summit, CARE offers our Top 10 Tips on how to meet the family planning needs of women in the world’s poorest countries by 2020.  

1. Universal access to contraception saves women's lives!

This would mean 25% fewer maternal deaths, actually.

2. STOP discussing whether or not family planning is a human right. 

Everyone already agreed it WAS in the 1994 Cario Programme of Action.

Pages