Education

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I come from Panriang County of Unity State in South Sudan, an area that is rich of oil and where, in fact, about 50 percent of our oil reserves get explored. In 1987, when I was in my early teenage years, I joined the Sudan People’s Liberation Army/ Movement (SPLM/A). At that time, a lot of innocent Sudanese civilians particularly from Southern Sudan suffered from years of attacks on their villages, bombings and fighting. I grew up in a country that had already experienced two decades of war – conflict was all I knew.

Most young people in Andoung Tek commune in the southwestern province of Cambodia are eager to migrate to other provinces or over the border to Thailand, as they expect to have higher income there than by doing local work in their village. But Miss Channary smiled and said, “I don’t need to migrate outside to earn money because money is around me. I just need a chance and time to catch it.”

Sports and Education

Whether it’s basketball or soccer, boxing or swimming, sport builds character and promotes teamwork. CARE’s Power Within signature program uses the convening power of sport to engage impoverished youth with each other and their communities. Our strategic combination of sports and education not only means more young people are going to school, but they are also learning leadership skills that can open doors to a better way of life.

Girls Empowered

The right to education is fundamental to the attainment and exercise of all human rights. From global movements such as Education for All (EFA) and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), to community-level declarations regarding equitable and free education, real and positive change is opening up educational opportunities previously not available to many of today’s children and youth.

Education Plus: A Policy Agenda to Unlock the Power of Girls

The world’s future will be largely shaped by today’s girls and tomorrow’s women. A growing body of evidence indicates that girls’ well-being is critical to progress on a range of developmental outcomes: an educated girl is more likely to delay marriage and childbirth, enjoy greater income and productivity and raise fewer, healthier and better-educated children.1 Indeed, investments in girls’ education may go further than any other spending in global development.

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