Education

Children are naturally hungry to learn, but face daunting barriers to attending school, especially girls. CARE works to address the roots of those impediments as a way to increase learning opportunities.

Among those barriers are hunger, lower social status, chores, early marriage, school safety and sanitation.

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As I entered the hut, I paused. Pulling the end of my dupatta (piece of cloth used by women to cover their chest and head), I wiped off perspiration from my brow. Mariam came forward to greet me and holding my hand, led me inside her hut. She asked some seated women to create space between them and sat me down. She yelled to her daughter Rahmat to bring me something to drink. The child obliged. Mariam handed me a glass of sherbet (sweetened drink) which I drank slowly. Once I had had my fill, I handed back the glass to her.

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“My parents were desperate and did not know what to do. I suggested to them that I could start working. I am a child. It is more difficult for the police to catch me,” Abdulwahad says.

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About a year ago, Bader was an average 15-year-old boy. Now, he's the man of the family, working to make ends meet.

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When 14-year-old Khaled left his home town Dara’a in the south of Syria nine months ago, life as he knew it ceased to exist.

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AMMAN (Nov. 15, 2013) Ahead of International Children's Day on November 20, CARE voices our concern about Syrian refugee families becoming increasingly reliant on child labor to meet basic survival needs such as food and rent. According to the latest Jordanian government estimates around 30,000 Syrian children are currently working in Jordan. The International Labor Organization warns that the number of child laborers in Jordan may be even higher. In Lebanon, at least 50,000 Syrian refugee children need to work to support their families.

The government affirmed its commitment to bilingual education for ethnic minority children in Cambodia’s northern provinces at a UNESCO conference in Bangkok last week.

Half of the world’s out-of-school children live in conflict-affected areas. Getting those children back to school can save their lives, their health – and their futures.

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