Climate Change

We go to the Philippines, to look at Typhoon relief efforts there, and the growing vulnerability of island nations.

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Solar lamps are a simple, fundamental intervention that can improve the lives of the rural poor in Rwanda.

Having no electricity, families traditionally rely on kerosene or battery power to light their homes at night.

These energy sources are not only expensive – even unaffordable to families living on less than $2.50 a day – but also present environmental, health and safety concerns.

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Currently, some 2 billion people worldwide do not have access to clean, safe cooking fuels.

This contributes to economic, health and environmental problems, including deforestation, and places an enormous burden on poor families.

CARE has significant experience introducing clean energy products in vulnerable communities.  

In Darfur, Sudan, for example, CARE introduced fuel-efficient stoves to reduce demand on the region’s scant supply of firewood – a source of communal tension and violence. 

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In Bangladesh, one of the biggest problems people face is increasingly frequent and severe flooding. This affects access to food and clean water, as well as people’s ability to earn a living.

CARE worked with community leaders to create innovative counter-measures. Many of their ideas were as simple as they are effective. For example, raising poultry is a common livelihood strategy – especially for women. Unfortunately, chickens often drown during protracted floods; this can be a major blow to household economies.

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High in Ecuadorian cloud forest, CARE is testing a program to help families harvest water from the air for drinking and washing.

On a foggy day, the mist collection system – made of a stainless steel screen, PVC piping, a water collection bucket and sensors – can net up to 200 liters of water, which is then filtered and ready for use in the home.

Before the system was installed three months ago, Maria and her daughter walked down to the river and back up the mountain carrying heavy buckets of water whenever her extended family of 11 cooked, bathed or cleaned the dishes.

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