Child Poverty

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“My parents were desperate and did not know what to do. I suggested to them that I could start working. I am a child. It is more difficult for the police to catch me,” Abdulwahad says.

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About a year ago, Bader was an average 15-year-old boy. Now, he's the man of the family, working to make ends meet.

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When 14-year-old Khaled left his home town Dara’a in the south of Syria nine months ago, life as he knew it ceased to exist.

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AMMAN (Nov. 15, 2013) Ahead of International Children's Day on November 20, CARE voices our concern about Syrian refugee families becoming increasingly reliant on child labor to meet basic survival needs such as food and rent. According to the latest Jordanian government estimates around 30,000 Syrian children are currently working in Jordan. The International Labor Organization warns that the number of child laborers in Jordan may be even higher. In Lebanon, at least 50,000 Syrian refugee children need to work to support their families.

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Poverty puts children in jeopardy the second their lives begin.

This ‘burden’ said no to child marriage, and demanded an education instead.

 

It was all arranged, even the dowry.

After she completed her primary education, Lutfa, now 17, had to drop out of school to help her family with the housework. And yet, they still saw her as a burden -- just another mouth to feed, a girl who couldn’t bring value to the family.

“I was broken inside, as my dream to educate myself remained unfulfilled, and on top of that, I started to doubt my abilities to change my life.”

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