Child Marriage

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CARE is a leader in advocacy to end child marriage. One of our key roles is co-chairing Girls Not Brides: The United States Partnership to End Child Marriage (GNB USA, formerly the Child Marriage Coalition).  GNB USA is comprised of more than 50 organizations with offices in the United States, and is officially affiliated with Girls Not Brides, a global partnership of more than 300 civil society organizations from 67 countries working to address child marriage, and much of our work is undertaken in regular consultation and coordination with the Global Secretariat based in London.

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Tipping Point advocacy efforts are geared towards using learning, documentation and analysis to build evidence for advocacy against early marriage and to support momentum for action and change in Bangladesh, Nepal and more broadly. Recognizing that practices such as early marriage that are rooted in social norms will not be solved solely through legal or policy means, the project’s advocacy extends beyond a focus on formal policies (e.g. minimum age of marriage laws) to include efforts to influence and transform social and structural drivers of early marriage.

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It’s July, 2014. What Has Tipping Point Learned So Far?

Child Grooms: Several communities in our working areas of Nepal arrange and celebrate marriages between children aged as young as 4. Brides and grooms might not see each other again until they near puberty, when they are expected to begin marital life. Boys, too, are denied the choice of if, when, and who to marry. In coming months, we will explore the impact on boys.

The Tipping Point project is using a Developmental Evaluation (DE) approach to monitoring, evaluation, and learning (MEL) which leads to innovation through a focus on documentation, reflection, and learning so that we can refine strategies at every step of the way. Many people naturally experiment, by trying out new ways of doing something, and then changing what they are doing based on feedback loops and changing needs and demands. However, traditional monitoring and evaluation systems do not usually value or support this experimentation.

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