Emergency

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"Whenever we went to class there were bombs." Razan, a young Syrian woman, had always done well in school and prided herself on her good grades.   But as she took an important test, she couldn't concentrate. "Bombs were going off right nearby during the exam session. My stomach hurt from the stress."

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When Typhoon Haiyan’s 16-foot storm surge crashed into this seaside neighborhood in Tacloban, a group of 300 neighbors clung to a rope atop a roof. When it was over, only three houses were left standing in the seafront area.

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Your support in action

In response to the catastrophic storm that tore a path through the central Philippines on November 7 and 8, CARE has reached over 317,000 people with emergency assistance to date.

When Super Typhoon Haiyan slammed into the Philippines on Friday, Lourdes Hermilda had been with her husband and two children, counting down the days until the birth of their new baby.

Nearly a week after the storm, there are still thousands of people without electricity and drinking water. But in some places there are signs of hope.

"The typhoon caused huge devastation, so obviously access has been a problem," Nick Osborne, Vice President of Program, Partnerships, Learning and Advocacy for CARE, said.

A Filipino community in Fort Washington, Md., waits to hear from family members.

The Philippines government is committed to providing electricity to the areas hardest hit by Typhoon Haiyan by Dec. 24 in time for Christmas.

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MANILA (Nov. 20, 2013) — Families devastated by Typhoon Haiyan are joining CARE’s aid distribution efforts in central Philippines, as communities previously cut off receive critical food and supplies.

More than 4,000 people have been confirmed dead. And an estimated 13 million people have been affected by the typhoon, with 4 million forced from their homes — more than the entire population of Oregon.

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