Emergency

CARE South Sudan Hopes Ceasefire Will Allow Access to Those in Need

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JUBA (Jan. 24, 2014)—CARE welcomes the ceasefire agreement reached for South Sudan and hopes it will create an opportunity to reach hundreds of thousands of people who are in desperate need of help.

“There still are half a million people displaced across the country. Many are exhausted, traumatized and have had little food or water,” said Aimee Ansari, country director for CARE in South Sudan. “Many are still too afraid to go home, and given the scale of the destruction, may have no home to return to.”

Women and Girls at Risk as South Sudan Violence Continues, Warns CARE

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CARE calls for humanitarian access so that displaced people have food, water, shelter and health care

JUBA (Jan. 16, 2014)—As the armed conflict in South Sudan enters its second month, CARE calls for an end to the violence and continues to support lifesaving work in dozens of the country’s clinics. CARE is especially concerned about the effect of the violence on women and girls.

CARE: “Decisive action must follow words” on Syria Crisis

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AMMAN (Jan. 15, 2014)—At the closing of the second Kuwait Donor Conference, the global poverty-fighting organization CARE urges governments to ensure that today’s pledges for Syrians in need are quickly translated into aid delivery on the ground and that further assistance will be made available. Governments have pledged at least 1.4 billion USD with reports of higher totals as the conference comes to a close. In total, the United Nations appealed for $6.5 billion to address urgently needed humanitarian assistance inside and outside Syria. The conference aimed to rally international financial support to meet the basic needs of more than 10 million Syrians in need.

Earthquake in Haiti: CARE Banks on Women in Recovery

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Four years after a deadly earthquake devastated Haiti, a web of political gridlock, donor fatigue and chaotic property laws continues to stall rebuilding in one of the world's poorest countries. But the humanitarian organization CARE is working to remove another, oft-overlooked barrier — lack of participation by women — as a way to strengthen recovery efforts and build a better foundation for the future. 

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