Emergency

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Wilma remains faithful that her new baby will be a bearer of good fortune for their family.

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Aileen was thrilled when she found out CARE and its local partner would be distributing shelter repair kits.

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Lyza's decisiveness and courage saved four lives, including that of her unborn baby.

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For Rolando Creado, 64, the safest place was to head to the mountains.

A rice farmer in the village of San Miguelay, about a 45 minute drive from Tacloban City in Leyte, Philippines, he knew things would be bad. After all, in a typical year, his village is flooded about six or seven times from various storms, thanks to a nearby river.

Typhoon Haiyan was imminent, with the threat of ferocious winds and heavy rains. So Rolando, his wife, son and grandchild headed to higher ground.

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Three months since Typhoon Haiyan slammed the Philippines, humanitarian organization CARE is increasingly concerned too many survivors remain without the means to meet their basic needs.

This month, CARE will expand its emergency programming to focus on helping vulnerable families restore such livelihoods as vegetable farming, rice production, fishing and other income-generating activities.

The disaster, which hit the island nation last November 8 and 9, affected some 5.9 million workers, 2.6 million of whom have been identified as most vulnerable.

Bamako, Mali - Ahead of the Sahel Appeal to be launched by the United Nations on the February 3, 2014 in Rome, 11 humanitarian agencies warn that northern Mali is set to face another serious food crisis unless funds are rapidly mobilized.

More than 800,000 people need immediate food assistance, and across the country, 3 million people are at risk of not finding enough to eat. More than half of these people are living in northern Mali.

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JUBA (Jan. 24, 2014)—CARE welcomes the ceasefire agreement reached for South Sudan and hopes it will create an opportunity to reach hundreds of thousands of people who are in desperate need of help.

“There still are half a million people displaced across the country. Many are exhausted, traumatized and have had little food or water,” said Aimee Ansari, country director for CARE in South Sudan. “Many are still too afraid to go home, and given the scale of the destruction, may have no home to return to.”

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