Emergency

"It looks like an apocalyptic disaster," Sandra Bulling ... told Al Jazeera on Monday.

CARE's Nick Osborne spoke to Fox 5 Atlanta about our typhoon recovery efforts in the Philippines.

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MANILA (Nov. 9) — CARE and its partners are responding to the needs of families affected by super typhoon Haiyan, which has torn a path across central Philippines, affecting an estimated 10 million people.

More than 790,000 people have been evacuated because of the typhoon, with heavy rains, storm surges and winds of up to 170 miles per hour battering central Philippines since Friday. CARE Philippines’ disaster reduction advisor, Celso Dulce, said information was beginning to come in that indicated the extent of destruction caused by Haiyan.

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When I met Zyad for the first time, he was registering himself in CARE’s refugee centre in Amman. He asked me whether he could tell me his story. He said he wanted the world to hear it.

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Typhoon Haiyan, here in the Philippines also known as Yolanda, made landfall this morning at 4:40. I was watching the news and it showed extremely strong winds, heavy rains and damages in the affected areas. Since then, the super storm has crossed through half of our country and the eye of the typhoon is now hovering over the western areas of central Philippines. Haiyan is incredible big, it is 600 kilometres wide.

To give Syrian refugees a louder voice amid a conflict whose political dimensions draw most of the world’s attention, American photographers Robert Fogarty and Ben Reece first gave them felt-tip markers. The refugees eagerly wrote messages to world leaders on their arms and hands. Then Reece and Fogarty, who travelled with CARE to Jordan in September 2013, photographed them.

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It has been two years since the January 26, 2001, earthquake in India that left death and devastation in its wake. As one of the first humanitarian organizations to respond, CARE began providing lifesaving emergency supplies and services to four of the hardest-hit areas of Kutch District. Yet, even after basic needs were met -- and the television crews went home, CARE stayed on the scene to help survivors recover and rebuild.

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CARE calls for the immediate support of millions of Syrian refugees so they can protect themselves from the cold weather in the coming months.

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