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CARE is one of the world's largest private international humanitarian organizations, committed to helping families in poor communities improve their lives and achieve lasting victories over poverty. The organization was founded in 1945, when 22 American organizations came together to rush lifesaving CARE Packages® to survivors of World War II. CARE quickly became a trusted vehicle for the compassion and generosity of millions. Originally located in New York City, we moved our headquarters to Atlanta, Georgia, in 1993. We are located at 151 Ellis Street, NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30303-2440 USA.
 
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Press releases

10/6/14

CARE: Shifting Social Norms to Achieve Gender Equality

CARE International is taking part in the European Week of Action for Girls to advocate for gender equality.

9/30/14

‘World cannot look away from suffering of refugees fleeing fighting in Syria’, says aid agency CARE

‘Terrified, exhausted and often with no idea where to go next’, more than 140,000 Syrian people who have fled the violence in Kobane for Turkey are in desperate need of...

9/25/14

CARE Village Savings and Loan Associations Surpass 4 Million Members

Microfinance groups first developed by CARE in 1991 featured in new book by Pulitzer Prize-winners Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

9/24/14

Aid to South Sudan is saving lives, yet millions remain in desperate need

With harvesting season approaching, CARE has called for urgent action to reduce needless deaths from hunger and malnutrition.

9/22/14

More than 60,000 newly arrived Syrian refugees in Turkey in urgent need of humanitarian assistance

CARE assessment team on the ground TURKEY—(September 22, 2014)--CARE is deeply concerned about the influx of around 66,000 refugees who have crossed the border to Turkey in...

9/15/14

CARE Chefs to Host Advocacy Dinner in Houston

HOUSTON (Sept. 15, 2014) — Celebrity chef Spike Mendelsohn and Atlanta chef Asha Gomez will host a CARE advocacy dinner in Houston this week to raise awareness about global...

9/8/14

Hunger Data Experts Confirm Risk of Famine in South Sudan

Best solution to avert famine is for all parties to lay down their weapons immediately, says CARE

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TESFA Results

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TESFA’s goal is to improve economic, and sexual and reproductive health outcomes for ever-married adolescent girls in Ethiopia. CARE Ethiopia and its partners implemented the program, and the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) evaluated it.  TESFA relies on peer-education within small group settings modeled on CARE’s village savings and loans (VSLA) approach. Community support is provided by groups of 20 to 30 community members, who meet once a month to discuss how to support girls and receive their own training on gender and health.

TESFA Brief

TESFA is a 3 year project funded by the Nike Foundation that works to improve economic, and sexual and reproductive health outcomes for ever‐married adolescent girls in Ethiopia. 

Girls Not Brides

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CARE is a leader in advocacy to end child marriage. One of our key roles is co-chairing Girls Not Brides: The United States Partnership to End Child Marriage (GNB USA, formerly the Child Marriage Coalition).  GNB USA is comprised of more than 50 organizations with offices in the United States, and is officially affiliated with Girls Not Brides, a global partnership of more than 300 civil society organizations from 67 countries working to address child marriage, and much of our work is undertaken in regular consultation and coordination with the Global Secretariat based in London.

Advocacy Strategy

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Tipping Point advocacy efforts are geared towards using learning, documentation and analysis to build evidence for advocacy against early marriage and to support momentum for action and change in Bangladesh, Nepal and more broadly. Recognizing that practices such as early marriage that are rooted in social norms will not be solved solely through legal or policy means, the project’s advocacy extends beyond a focus on formal policies (e.g. minimum age of marriage laws) to include efforts to influence and transform social and structural drivers of early marriage.

Learning From The Tipping Point: Sneak Peek

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It’s July, 2014. What Has Tipping Point Learned So Far?

Child Grooms: Several communities in our working areas of Nepal arrange and celebrate marriages between children aged as young as 4. Brides and grooms might not see each other again until they near puberty, when they are expected to begin marital life. Boys, too, are denied the choice of if, when, and who to marry. In coming months, we will explore the impact on boys.

Our Approach

The Tipping Point project is using a Developmental Evaluation (DE) approach to monitoring, evaluation, and learning (MEL) which leads to innovation through a focus on documentation, reflection, and learning so that we can refine strategies at every step of the way. Many people naturally experiment, by trying out new ways of doing something, and then changing what they are doing based on feedback loops and changing needs and demands. However, traditional monitoring and evaluation systems do not usually value or support this experimentation.

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