Timor Leste

Country Info

CARE has been operating in Timor-Leste since 1994, originally as part of CARE Indonesia and as an autonomous country office since 2000. In that time, CARE has engaged in two major emergency responses following the violent events that occurred in 1999 and 2006.

CARE in Timor-Leste focuses on long-term sustainable development projects in agriculture and disaster risk reduction, education, community health and nutrition, capacity building, urban community outreach and peace-building, rural infrastructure and employment, and women’s participation and gender equality.

 

Our Work in Timor Leste

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

Child Survival

This year, more than 7 million children will die before their 5th birthday.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Agriculture

By failing to close the gender gap in agriculture, the world is paying dearly.

Climate Change

Climate change threatens the very survival of people living in poverty all over the world.

Child Nutrition

Malnutrition affects 200 million children and the consequences can last a lifetime.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

Arminda Pererira Plans for the Future

CARE works with poor families in Timor Leste to help them grow their own crops, improve their diet, sell surplus crops for a profit and store their seeds for the next season.

Take the example of Arminda Pererira, a mother of six children between the ages of 4 and 17 and a member of a women’s farmer group. Her involvement with CARE taught her agricultural techniques that will help her plan for the future.

Asia Impact Report 2005-2010

This report is an analytical review of CARE’s programs and projects undertaken with partners and allies in 16 countries over the period 2005–2010. It explores CARE’s principal strategies for achieving positive impact by drawing on a broad range of evaluations and other assessments produced over the period. 

Arminda Pererira Plans for the Future

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CARE works with poor families in Timor Leste to help them grow their own crops, improve their diet, sell surplus crops for a profit and store their seeds for the next season.

Take the example of Arminda Pererira, a mother of six children between the ages of 4 and 17 and a member of a women’s farmer group. Her involvement with CARE taught her agricultural techniques that will help her plan for the future.

These Are Our Sisters

Gender-based violence is one of the most widespread – but least recognized – human rights abuses in the world. Globally, one out of three women will be beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime. This violence is happening to our sisters, mothers, grandmothers, aunts and daughters around the world.

This violence leaves survivors with long-term psychological and physical trauma; tears away at the social fabric of communities; and is used with terrifying effect in conflict settings, with women as the main target.

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