Tanzania

Country Info

CARE began working in Tanzania in April 1994, in response to the crisis in Rwanda and the subsequent influx of refugees into the Kagera Region of North-western Tanzania. Over the ensuing years, CARE Tanzania developed innovative education, health, microfinance, and environmental programs across most regions of the country.

 

Our Work in Tanzania

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Agriculture

By failing to close the gender gap in agriculture, the world is paying dearly.

Climate Change

Climate change threatens the very survival of people living in poverty all over the world.

Latest News from Tanzania

Prisca gives her Kids a Chance She Didn’t Get

Realizing Rights, Protecting Forests: An Alternative Vision for Reducing Deforestation

Respecting the rights and realities of indigenous peoples and forest-dependent communities is the way to ensure that the forests remain standing.

Read More

Humanitarian Implications of Climate Change

Mapping Emerging Trends and Risk Hotspots

Read More

Sports and Education

Whether it’s basketball or soccer, boxing or swimming, sport builds character and promotes teamwork. CARE’s Power Within signature program uses the convening power of sport to engage impoverished youth with each other and their communities. Our strategic combination of sports and education not only means more young people are going to school, but they are also learning leadership skills that can open doors to a better way of life.

Read More

Field Notes: Celebrating International Day of the Girl

As we celebrate International Day of the Girl, we can’t help remind ourselves of our own childhood.

Read More

Girls’ Leadership Development in Action: CARE’s Experience from the Field

We believe that the greatest obstacle to girls’ education is the low social status in which girls are held.

Read More

Education Plus: A Policy Agenda to Unlock the Power of Girls

The world’s future will be largely shaped by today’s girls and tomorrow’s women. A growing body of evidence indicates that girls’ well-being is critical to progress on a range of developmental outcomes: an educated girl is more likely to delay marriage and childbirth, enjoy greater income and productivity and raise fewer, healthier and better-educated children.1 Indeed, investments in girls’ education may go further than any other spending in global development.

Read More

Bringing Financial Services to Africa's Poor

“Bringing Financial Services to Africa’s Poor” focuses on microfinance, a tool that’s been proven effective against poverty in the developing world.

Read More

Connecting the World’s Poorest People to the Global Economy

The importance of expanding access to financial services for the world’s poorest people is increasingly recognized.

Read More

Economic Development Overview

CARE’s programs in Economic Development work to improve the economic security and income opportunities of the poor. Currently, CARE is implementing 74 economic development projects in 43 countries throughout Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and Latin America. In addition, CARE maintains ties with independent microfinance institutions (MFI) that have grown out of CARE’s economic development programming.

Read More

CARE Welcomes Michelle Obama, Laura Bush to African First Ladies Summit in Tanzania

DAR ES SALAAM (July 2, 2013) - The global poverty-fighting organization CARE welcomed first lady Michelle Obama, former first lady Laura Bush and other dignitaries to the African First Ladies Summit in Tanzania. Held in Dar es Salaam today and Wednesday, the Bush Institute's "Investing in Women: Strengthening Africa" Summit highlights successful practices that have helped women in Africa achieve economic self-sufficiency.

"We've seen that when women have the knowledge and skills to sell what they produce, they spend their earnings on food, health care and school...

Read More

Pages