Somalia

Looking to the Future

In 2011, a catastrophic drought struck the Horn of Africa, affecting Somalia, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Kenya. CARE continues its work there, helping communities become increasingly resilient for the future. 

The Horn of Africa Food and Refugee Crisis: One Year On

Responding to Crisis

Liz McLaughlin, Executive Director of CARE's Foundation Unit, traveled to the Horn of Africa in 2011 to see CARE's response to this massive emergency. She captured her journey on camera. 

Fighting Poverty & Drought with Honeybees

Nuriya, an Ethiopian mother of six children, has been able to make ends meet on her own since her husband passed away 11 years ago. By farming bees, a trade usually engaged by men, Nuriya is able to provide for her family.

Country Info

CARE has been providing emergency relief and lifesaving assistance to the Somali people since 1981. Our main program activities since then have included projects in water and sanitation, sustainable pastoralist activities, civil society and media development, small-scale enterprise development, primary school education, teacher training, adult literacy and vocational training. We work in partnership with Somali and international aid agencies, civil society leaders and local authorities.

CARE Somalia is currently operational in the northern regions of Puntland and Somaliland.

Our Work in Somalia

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

These Are Our Sisters

Gender-based violence is one of the most widespread – but least recognized – human rights abuses in the world. Globally, one out of three women will be beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime. This violence is happening to our sisters, mothers, grandmothers, aunts and daughters around the world.

This violence leaves survivors with long-term psychological and physical trauma; tears away at the social fabric of communities; and is used with terrifying effect in conflict settings, with women as the main target.

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Food insecurity and conflict still a threat for the Horn of Africa, Dadaab refugee camp running out of funding

NAIROBI (July 13, 2012) – One year on from the devastating drought and famine that affected more than 12 million people in the Horn of Africa region, CARE is calling on governments and donors to take action to stop the repeated cycle of food crises in the region.

Market Engagement Capacity Strategy

Currently, CARE is implementing over 74 economic development programs in 66 countries. CARE’s position as one of the world’s largest international non-governmental organizations allows its economic development programs to extend this reach to achieve lasting impacts in fighting poverty. Our focus on the underlying causes of poverty and long-term presence in many countries, allow us to mobilize partnerships and resources to address some of the most intractable challenges countries face, bringing in the specialized expertise that is needed.

One Year Update: Horn of Africa Food Security Emergency

In the year since the United Nations declared a famine in parts of Somalia, much has been accomplished. Large-scale humanitarian interventions by CARE and other agencies have helped save many lives. But families still struggle to feed themselves, and remain highly vulnerable to future events such as poor harvests, conflict-related displacement or a rise in commodity prices. Many who survived the worst of the crisis have been left without the reserves to withstand further shocks.

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