Lebanon

2014 Recap: A Dire Year for Syrian Refugees

CARE looks back on the last 12 months working with Syrian refugees. 

SYRIA: Images From Inside

An illustration of the life Syrian refugees left behind, images shared with CARE Syrian refugee volunteers, as captured by their family who have remained behind.

Young Voices From Syria

We asked five young Syrian refugees to share their dreams and a message to the world. What they had to say was both heartbreaking and inspiring.

More than 2.8 million people have fled the country

You can help us reach people in desperate need and support our poverty-fighting programs by making your tax-deductible gift today.

Country Info

In Lebanon, CARE has set up operations in 2013 to support the growing needs of Syrian refugees. Over the next two years, our emergency response includes:

  • Supporting refugees to seek assistance so that they are able to address their immediate needs;
  • Providing access to shelter for newly arrived refugees and crisis-displaced families;
  • Assisting refugees and host communities with livelihood opportunities and vocational training that will help them earn a living;
  • Supporting refugees and host communities with access to water and sanitation;
  • Ensuring support for host communities that have been overwhelmed by the crisis; and
  • Providing psychosocial support, protecting the rights of vulnerable women and helping prevent gender-based violence.

Download the country factsheet 

Our Work in Lebanon

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Latest News from LebanonSyria

She Was Still Playing with Dolls When She Married

Q&A With CARE Lebanon’s Country Director

Bernard Borkhosh answers questions about the crisis in Syria and what CARE is currently doing in Lebanon to help the more than 1.2 million Syrian refugees now living there.

She Was Still Playing with Dolls When She Married

Seven months ago 8-year-old Aamina had to flee from her home in Aleppo to Lebanon. “We were the last ones to leave our neighbourhood. All the houses were bombed. The streets were full of rubble and dirt. It looked like a ghost town.”  Aamina’s new home is in Sabra, one of the most impoverished and highly populated parts of Beirut. Sabra was set up more than 60 years ago as a camp for Palestinian refugees. In the past months and years, more and more Syrian refugees like Aamina and her family have arrived here. They cannot afford to live anywhere else.

I Feel Powerless

The light goes on and off. It flickers for a few seconds, and then everything turns dark again. Hala sits on the floor of her small room in Beirut. Ahmed, one of her five sons, runs to one of the room’s corners. Unerringly he climbs over a suitcase which lies around. He knows exactly which lumps and bumps he has to watch out for. In Sabra, one of the poorest and most densely populated areas of the Lebanese capital, the electricity hardly ever works. It gets dark early here, but the light bulb never lasts longer than a few minutes.

I Used to Live in a Palace

Sabeen is a Palestinian refugee from Syria who fled to Lebanon a year and a half ago with eight of her children, a daughter-in-law and four grandchildren.  A son and a brother were left behind in Syria.  The son wanted to join them but was unable to get a visa. He tried to smuggle himself into the country but was arrested, detained for two months, and sent back to Syria.  This family might not be in Lebanon much longer anyway. All family members have expired Lebanese visas and are vulnerable to refoulement, or forced return to Syria.

ABC News: Syrian Refugees Battered by Winter Need More US Help

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It’s a brutal winter in the Middle East, which means added suffering for the millions of Syrian refugees already struggling to survive.

The region was pounded with a harsh winter storm that many refugees were unable to prepare for, and several children in refugee camps in Lebanon died.

Aid agencies, including CARE, are being challenged to keep up with the surmounting humanitarian needs, and are urgently calling on the international community to provide more funds. The 2014 UN appeal faced a 46% funding shortfall.

A Pair of Sneakers and a Smile

Early on a warm Thursday morning in May, my colleague Rouwaida and I drove from Beirut to CARE’s office in Mount Lebanon. Two months ago, Syrian refugees and CARE staff ran the Dead Sea to Red Sea marathon in Jordan and raised more than $25,000. Using a portion of that money, we were able to distribute vouchers for clothes to families with children living in a collective shelter called “Silver Star,” Ketermaya and Dalhoun informal tented settlement. “Silver Star,” a former school, is home to 35 refugee families from Syria.

In Syria and Neighboring Countries “winter puts Syrian families at risk of disease and death”

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AMMAN - As another harsh winter season approaches in the Middle East, CARE International calls for the immediate release of further funding to support millions of people caught up in the conflict in Syria and in neighbouring countries.

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