Latin America & Caribbean

CARE in Latin America and the Caribbean

In fiscal year 2013, we worked in 86 countries, supporting 927 humanitarian aid and development projects to reach more than 97 million people. We carried out programs in the following 10 countries throughout Latin America and the Caribbean:

Our Work in Latin America & Caribbean

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

What About Men & Boys?

When men and boys are most actively engaged in fighting poverty, real and lasting change is more...

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

HIV & AIDS

Poverty is both a cause and consequence of HIV and AIDS.

Child Survival

This year, more than 7 million children will die before their 5th birthday.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Support Food Aid Reform

What if we can feed 4 million more hungry people globally, without spending an extra dollar?

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Agriculture

By failing to close the gender gap in agriculture, the world is paying dearly.

Climate Change

Climate change threatens the very survival of people living in poverty all over the world.

Hunger in Emergencies

When emergency strikes, hunger can be close behind.

Child Nutrition

Malnutrition affects 200 million children and the consequences can last a lifetime.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

Mireille Is on the Road to Financial Stability

Three years ago, a massive earthquake destroyed Mireille Henry's home in Haiti, killing her mother and trapping her daughter under the rubble for five hours.

The mother of four lost everything she owned. Mireille didn't even have a spoon to feed her children, she says, or a blanket to keep them warm. She relocated to a field with her family. On the luckiest days, they got to sleep under a tree.

But Mireille has rebuilt her life, through the help of her community and an innovative microsavings program, introduced by CARE to Haiti and Mireille's community in 2011. The program serves the poorest of the poor – people who do not otherwise have access to the types financial services much of the world takes for granted. 

House of Representatives rejects amendment to source food in local markets rather than buy and ship food aid from the US.

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Every five seconds, a child dies from hunger-related diseases, and nearly 1 billion people go to bed hungry every night.

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“There has never been a greater need for a comprehensive and sustainable approach to tackling hunger and malnutrition. And in a tough budget climate, we must maximize the effect of our aid dollars. Impact is about efficiency, effectiveness and commitment,” Helene Gayle, president and CEO of CARE USA, writes in a CQ Roll Call opinion piece. 

Read the article > 

Since the end of the war, America's "Food for Peace" programme has shipped American-grown food in sacks across the world to feed the world's starving people. Virtually all experts agree it's an inefficient way to send aid, and the EU stopped doing it decades ago.

Read more:

Feeding the World: America's New Deal

 

Image (media): 

First she learned to weld toys. Then jet engines. Then she helped put a country back together.

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