Guatemala

Country Info

CARE has operated in Guatemala since 1959 and has developed an extensive working relationship with agencies in the public and private sectors.

 

Our Work in Guatemala

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Child Survival

This year, more than 7 million children will die before their 5th birthday.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Agriculture

By failing to close the gender gap in agriculture, the world is paying dearly.

Climate Change

Climate change threatens the very survival of people living in poverty all over the world.

Child Nutrition

Malnutrition affects 200 million children and the consequences can last a lifetime.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, Administration Officials Visit Guatemala and Honduras with CARE to Explore Global Hunger Issues

WASHINGTON — Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., and a bi-partisan delegation of administration officials traveled with the global poverty-fighting organization CARE to Central America to see the role communities and smallholder farmers play in promoting local solutions to improving food and nutrition security.

Former Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman, corporate sector partners from Cargill, and the media also traveled on the trip to bring their expertise and perspective to issues around global hunger.

These Are Our Sisters

Gender-based violence is one of the most widespread – but least recognized – human rights abuses in the world. Globally, one out of three women will be beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime. This violence is happening to our sisters, mothers, grandmothers, aunts and daughters around the world.

This violence leaves survivors with long-term psychological and physical trauma; tears away at the social fabric of communities; and is used with terrifying effect in conflict settings, with women as the main target.

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