Cote d'Ivoire

Country Info

CARE International began work in Côte d’Ivoire in 2000. We assist those people displaced by the civil unrest, who lack food and potable water in some regions, and face serious health issues in regions where formal health systems have essentially crumbled. We concentrate on regions deprived of basic public services with projects throughout the country in urban sanitation, rehabilitation, and social cohesion.

 

Our Work in Cote d'Ivoire

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

HIV & AIDS

Poverty is both a cause and consequence of HIV and AIDS.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

Our Vision

We seek a world of hope, tolerance and social justice, where poverty has been overcome and people live in dignity and security.

Confessions of a CARE Dad

Image (media): 

Balla Sidibé, Country Director for CARE Côte d’Iviore, weighs in on his personal experiences managing workload and fatherhood.

How have you been able to balance your roles as father and Country Director? They are complementary.  It’s challenging to be a new CD. When I leave the office and go home, I can play with my children and do simple things outside of my normal work day.  I also have a nanny and when I travel, my mother or my mother-in-law comes to visit so that someone is with the children.

These Are Our Sisters

Gender-based violence is one of the most widespread – but least recognized – human rights abuses in the world. Globally, one out of three women will be beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime. This violence is happening to our sisters, mothers, grandmothers, aunts and daughters around the world.

This violence leaves survivors with long-term psychological and physical trauma; tears away at the social fabric of communities; and is used with terrifying effect in conflict settings, with women as the main target.

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