Bolivia

Country Info

CARE started working in Bolivia in 1976 with the construction of rural water systems. Over the years, in order to respond to the emerging needs of the poor population, we expanded our program areas to include health care, education, infrastructure and agriculture development actions.

Currently, our portfolio in Bolivia includes projects in sexual and reproductive health and rights, alternative and intercultural education, HIV-AIDS, disaster preparedness, emergency relief, conservation and development, food security, rural income generation, primary health care, family planning, community organization, women’s empowerment, local economic development in urban contexts, child labor prevention, and natural resources management.

Our Work in Bolivia

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

Child Survival

This year, more than 7 million children will die before their 5th birthday.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Agriculture

By failing to close the gender gap in agriculture, the world is paying dearly.

Climate Change

Climate change threatens the very survival of people living in poverty all over the world.

Child Nutrition

Malnutrition affects 200 million children and the consequences can last a lifetime.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

Our Vision

We seek a world of hope, tolerance and social justice, where poverty has been overcome and people live in dignity and security.

Challenging Gender-based Violence Worldwide: CARE's Program Evidence

Stategies, Results and Impacts of Evaluations 2011 - 2013

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Reaching Resilience Handbook

A handbook for aid practitioners and policymakers in disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation and poverty reduction

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Donate to CARE This Holiday Season

CARE 2012 Annual Report Facts & Figures

Program Brief | CARE’s Commitment to Ending Gender-Based Violence

These Are Our Sisters

Gender-based violence is one of the most widespread – but least recognized – human rights abuses in the world. Globally, one out of three women will be beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime. This violence is happening to our sisters, mothers, grandmothers, aunts and daughters around the world.

This violence leaves survivors with long-term psychological and physical trauma; tears away at the social fabric of communities; and is used with terrifying effect in conflict settings, with women as the main target.

It doesn't have to be this way. Women and men...

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Child Poverty

Adaptation to the Impact of Rapid Glacier Retreat in the Tropical Andes Project

Climate Change (Adaptation) in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru

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PECCN Pages

September 2012 Issue of CARE's Poverty Environment & Climate Change Network Newsletter

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Humanitarian Implications of Climate Change

Mapping Emerging Trends and Risk Hotspots

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